Behold The Closing Scenes Of Christ's Life

Beholding Directory

By Beholding We Become Changed

Behold Christ In The Scriptures

Behold Christ While Praying

Contemplate Christ's Perfection; Not Man's Imperfection

The Preciousness of Christ To His Followers

Behold The Closing Scenes Of Christ's Life

Introduction

These three paragraphs come from a lengthy chapter addressed to a pastor in the fourth volume of the Testimonies. Entitled "Consecration in Ministers," it would be a blessing if all pastors were to read and evaluate their ministry on the basis of this chapter. One particularly challenging paragraph calls pastors to spend hours each day in prayer to gain power for ministry, as well as humbly serve His congregation on His knees. These paragraphs speak to the value of pastors frequently reviewing the closing scenes of Christ's life. What would be true for pastors is also true for members. The following quote is an often repeated paragraph that is also found in the book Desire of Ages.—Dan

"It would be well to spend a thoughtful hour each day reviewing the life of Christ from the manger to Calvary. We should take it point by point and let the imagination vividly grasp each scene, especially the closing ones of His earthly life. By thus contemplating His teachings and sufferings, and the infinite sacrifice made by Him for the redemption of the race, we may strengthen our faith, quicken our love, and become more deeply imbued with the spirit which sustained our Saviour."

Testimonies To The Church, Vol. 4, 374.1

Review The Closing Scenes

Mrs. E. G. White

An Excerpt

It will do you good, and our ministers generally, to frequently review the closing scenes in the life of our Redeemer. Here, beset with temptations as He was, we may all learn lessons of the utmost importance to us. It would be well to spend a thoughtful hour each day reviewing the life of Christ from the manger to Calvary. We should take it point by point and let the imagination vividly grasp each scene, especially the closing ones of His earthly life. By thus contemplating His teachings and sufferings, and the infinite sacrifice made by Him for the redemption of the race, we may strengthen our faith, quicken our love, and become more deeply imbued with the spirit which sustained our Saviour. If we would be saved at last we must all learn the lesson of penitence and faith at the foot of the cross. Christ suffered humiliation to save us from everlasting disgrace. He consented to have scorn, mockery, and abuse fall upon Him in order to shield us. It was our transgression that gathered the veil of darkness about His divine soul and extorted the cry from Him, as of one smitten and forsaken of God. He bore our sorrows; He was put to grief for our sins. He made Himself an offering for sin, that we might be justified before God through Him. Everything noble and generous in man will respond to the contemplation of Christ upon the cross. {4T 374.1}

I long to see our ministers dwell more upon the cross of Christ, their own hearts, meanwhile, softened and subdued by the Saviour’s matchless love, which prompted that infinite sacrifice. If, in connection with the theory of the truth, our ministers would dwell more upon practical godliness, speaking from a heart imbued with the spirit of truth, we should see many more souls flocking to the standard of truth; their hearts would be touched by the pleadings of the cross of Christ, the infinite generosity and pity of Jesus in suffering for man. These vital subjects, in connection with the doctrinal points of our faith, would effect much good among the people. But the heart of the teacher must be filled with the experimental knowledge of the love of Christ.  {4T 374.2}

The mighty argument of the cross will convict of sin. The divine love of God for sinners, expressed in the gift of His Son to suffer shame and death that they might be ennobled and endowed with everlasting life, is the study of a lifetime. I ask you to study anew the cross of Christ. If all the proud and vainglorious, whose hearts are panting for the applause of men and for distinction above their fellows, could rightly estimate the value of the highest earthly glory in contrast with the value of the Son of God, rejected, despised, spit upon, by the very ones whom He came to redeem, how insignificant would appear all the honor that finite man can bestow. {4T 375.1}

Mrs. E. G. White, Testimonies, Vol. 4, 375.1